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  • For full copy of this documentaryClick Here
  • Since 2002, nearly 4.8 million Afghan refugees have returned to Afghanistan from neighbouring countries – often to rural areas without basic amenities. Saidullah and Hamim have lived in the Tangi settlement in Eastern Afghanistan since they returned from Pakistan 6 years ago. For full copy of this documentaryClick Here
  • In recent years, Pakistan has stepped up its efforts to repatriate Afghan refugees and conducted mass scale deportations. The influx of refugees in Afghanistan is set to continue. For full copy of this documentaryClick Here
  • The many years of occupation, war and internal conflict have left the Afghan society deeply fractured. An entire generation of Afghans has grown up without ever having experienced peace. For full copy of this documentaryClick Here
  • When the first refugees came to Tangi in 2006, it was a scorching desert and they settled in tents. Today they have built houses with assistance from government and NGOs, and Tangi has schools, mosques, a market and a health clinic. For full copy of this documentaryClick Here
  • As there is no agricultural land in Tangi, Hamim’s father rent land for farming in a neighbouring area. It is hard work to grow enough crops to feed the family. Often children need to help out with the work in the dry fields. For full copy of this documentaryClick Here
  • For many Afghan families, it is a challenge to make ends meet, and monthly living expenses frequently exceed salaries. Only 20% of the population have access to the public electric grid. Many families buy solar panels for generating electricity – if they can afford the investment. For full copy of this documentaryClick Here
  • Often families hold cows, goats and sheep for getting dairy products for own consumption and sale. But living close to livestock heavily increases the risk of catching malaria. Approximately 1.5 million cases of malaria occur every year in Afghanistan. For full copy of this documentaryClick Here
  • Returnees and IDPs put huge pressure on natural resources – especially on firewood. Wood often has to be collected at large distances and is usually the children’s job. For full copy of this documentaryClick Here
  • Water is an indispensable resource but often the only accessible water is dirty and has to be carried from long distances. DACAAR facilitates access to clean water by constructing pipe schemes with solar powered or hand-driven pumps. For full copy of this documentaryClick Here
  • Each year 50,000 children die from diarrhea in Afghanistan. DACAAR carries out health and hygiene education as an integral part of each water and sanitation project. For full copy of this documentaryClick Here
  • Radios are more common than TVs in rural parts of Afghanistan. DACAAR’s hygiene education is supplemented by shows on local radio stations that reinforce the messages on good hygiene practices. For full copy of this documentaryClick Here
  • Lack of proper toilet facilities poses a health hazard as diseases easily get spread and streams polluted by human waste. DACAAR assists families in building latrines to reduce the hazard. For full copy of this documentaryClick Here
  • Having a functioning school system is crucial to building the future of Afghanistan. Three million children remain deprived of education and only 26% of the adult population is literate. For full copy of this documentaryClick Here
  • Afghan children are often incredibly resilient, working hard in school and at home. With the improvements in health that come from access to clean water and better health and hygiene behaviours, children like Hamim can put more effort into studying. For full copy of this documentaryClick Here
  • Most Afghan children have little time for themselves between school and chores. Having water points closer to the house reduces the time spent on carrying water and means that sometimes, there is even time to play. For full copy of this documentaryClick Here
  • Daily life in Afghanistan differs widely between the urban and the rural population. Imagining life in a big modern city like Kabul – where buildings have many stories and where women go to university and work in offices – is challenging. Even for clever young boys in Tangi. For full copy of this documentaryClick Here
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